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Copy 3-6 graphics and 2 pages of understandable information. from the internet.
Put copied information on the bottom and your own writing with pictures on the top.
Label the copied information "Copied from the internet" Site the website where you got it.
Study the material you copied and prepare yourself to summarize what you found out.
Type 3 paragraphs in your own words using only words you understand...do not cut and paste!

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copy and paste info ..10
organization ..............5
3 paragraphs............10

Total points..............25
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external image fvolcan_medium.jpg?1236185045 external image kelby4.jpg external image Colima1.jpgexternal image mexico-travel-pictures-03-03-0769489_29573_600x450.jpg
external image Colima2.jpg The Volcán de Colima, also known as Volcán de Fuego is part of the Colima Volcanic Complex (CVC) consisting of Volcán de Colima, Nev-ado de Colima[ and the eroded "El Cantaro" (listed as extinct). It is the younger of the three and is currently one of the most active volcanos in Mexico and in North America. It has erupted more than 40 times since 1576. One of the largest eruptions was on January 20–24, 1913.[3] Nevado de Colima, also known as Tzapotépetl, lies 5 kilometers 1 miles) north its more active neighbor and is the taller of the two at 4,271+ meters (14,015+ ft). It is the 26th most prominent peak in North America.Despite its name, only a fraction of the volcano's surface area is in the state of Colima; the majority of its surface area lies over the border in the neighboring state of Jalisco, toward the western end of the Eje Volcánico Transversal mountain range. It is about 485 km (301 mi) west of Mexico City and 125 km (78 mi) south of Guadalajara, Jalisco.In the late Pleistocene era, a huge landslide occurred at the mountain, with approximately 25 km³ of debris travelling some 120 km, reaching the Pacific Ocean. An area of some 2,200 km² was covered in landslide deposits.The currently active cone is situated within a large caldera that was probably formed by a combination of landslides and large eruptions. About 300,000 people live within 40 km (25 miles) of the volcano, which makes it the most dangerous volcano in Mexico.[3] In light of its history of large eruptions and situation in a densely populated area, it was designated a Decade Volcano, singling it out for study.In recent years there have been frequent temporary evacuations of nearby villagers due to threatening volcanic activity. Eruptions have occurred in 1991, 1998–1999 and from 2001 to the present day, with activity being characterised by extrusion of viscous lava forming a lava dome, and occasional larger explosions, forming pyroclastic flows and dusting the areas surrounding the volcano with ash and tephra.The largest eruption for several years occurred on May 24, 2005. An ash cloud rose to over 3 km over the volcano, and satellite monitoring indicated that the cloud spread over an area extending 110 nautical miles (200 km) west of the volcano in the hours after the eruption [1]. Pyroclastic flows traveled four-five km from the vent, and lava bombs landed 3–4 km away. Authorities set up an exclusion zone within 6.5km of the summit.Located about 125 km (75 miles) south of Guadalajara, and cutting across the Mexican states of Colima and Jalisco the 13,325 ft. Colima (19.5N, 103.5W) is the most active volcano in Mexico. The activity depicted occurred in early March 1991. Avalanches of and gas from the summit were followed soon after by lava flows and more ash and steam from the steam plume can be seen drifting eastward from the summit and scars from the earlier avalanches can also be seen on the southwest slope of the volcano.